Brian Rutt

Professor of Radiology
and Electrical Engineering (tbd) - courtesy
and Bio-Engineering (tbd) - courtesy

office: Richard M. Lucas Center for Imaging
The Lucas Expansion, Room PS064
Stanford, CA 94305
phone: 650-721-6230
fax: 650-719-9222
email: brutt@stanford.edu

Links: Bio-X Affiliate

Brian Rutt joined the Stanford faculty as Professor of Radiology effective Jan. 1, 2009. Dr. Rutt, who is the author of more than 120 peer reviewed journal articles, is an internationally recognized expert in Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI). Prior to coming to Stanford, Dr. Rutt was Professor of Diagnostic Radiology and Nuclear Medicine and Medical Biophysics at the University of Western Ontario and the recipient of the Barnett-Ivey Heart and Stroke Foundation of Ontario Endowed Research Chair. Dr. Rutt has made important contributions in both the basic technology of MRI (e.g., leading-edge work in insertable gradient coils and RF components), biophysical measurements using MR (e.g., combined T1 and T2 mapping using gradient imaging sequences), basic science applications of MR (e.g., the first demonstrations of in-vivo detection of a single mammalian cell using MRI and the use of MR to longitudinally monitor tumor growth deep within tissue starting from a single cell), and clinical applications, especially in cardiovascular disease. Dr. Rutt is especially interested in developing and using in-vivo ultra-high field (e.g. 7 Tesla) Magnetic Resonance techniques to study important human diseases. The increased sensitivity and enhanced contrast mechanisms at these high field strengths should provide insight to unsolved problems, especially in neuroscience and cancer.

Research Interest

My research interests center on MRI research, including MRI technology development as well as applications of advanced MRI techniques to studying the cardiovascular system (particularly atherosclerosis), brain and cancer.

I have always had a strong engineering orientation in my research, and this has translated into the establishment of a strong MR hardware engineering program within my group and my institution. One outcome of this hardware engineering program has been the gradual development and refinement of a number of important concepts to enable micro imaging on whole-body clinical MRI scanners, including the development, integration and routine use of high performance insertable gradient coils. This technology development catalyzed the establishment of the cellular and molecular imaging program at Robarts, now internationally recognized, and apart from the technology development role, I have led the research applications of cellular and molecular MRI in cardiovascular disease.

I have also had a strong research focus on MR pulse sequence development for many years. Two of the innovative outcomes of this research focus have been the development of the SLINKY pulse sequence concept, a method for producing high quality MR images of blood vessels, and which formed the forerunner of today's continuously moving table MRI (which has become a very hot topic in the MRI research and clinical worlds, particularly for applications to imaging blood vessels in the whole body).

Peer-reviewed Representative Publications (of 120 in press)

  1. Deoni S, Rutt BK, Arun T, Pierpaoli C, Jones D. Gleaning multi-component T1 and T2 information from steady-state imaging data. Proceedings of the International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine Sixteenth Scientific Meeting, Toronto, Ontario, May 3-9, 2008.
  2. Hamilton A, MacLean K, Drangova M, Ronald J, Rutt BK, Boughner D, Rogers K. Evaluation of statin therapy in a rabbit model of aortic valve sclerosis using high resolution MRI. Proceedings of the International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine Sixteenth Scientific Meeting, Toronto, Ontario, May 3-9, 2008.
  3. Gonzalez-Lara L, Xu X, Hofstetrova K, Ramadan S, Geremia N, Pniak A, Chen Y, Weaver L, Rutt BK, Brown A, Foster P. In vivo tracking of mesenchymal stem cells in the injured mouse spinal cord. Proceedings of the International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine Sixteenth Scientific Meeting, Toronto, Ontario, May 3-9, 2008.
  4. Wang J, Boskamp E, Santyr G, Rutt BK. An efficient switched double-frequency birdcage coil for 3He and 1H imaging. Proceedings of the International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine Sixteenth Scientific Meeting, Toronto, Ontario, May 3-9, 2008.
  5. Alford J, Scholl T, Handler W, Rutt BK, Chronik B. From static to dynamic: Construction of a B0 insert for field-cycled contrast in a clinical MR scanner. Proceedings of the International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine Sixteenth Scientific Meeting, Toronto, Ontario, May 3-9, 2008.
  6. Wade T, Rutt BK. B1 correction using Double Angle Look-Locker (DALL). Proceedings of the International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine Sixteenth Scientific Meeting, Toronto, Ontario, May 3-9, 2008.
  7. Alford J, Rutt BK, Scholl T, Handler W, Chronik B. Delta relaxivity enhanced MR (dreMR): Theory of T1-slope weighted contrast. Proceedings of the International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine Sixteenth Scientific Meeting, Toronto, Ontario, May 3-9, 2008.
  8. Wood S, Rutt BK, Piel J, Whitt D, Fish K, Dixon W, Hancu I. Hyperpolarized 13C MRI with triple-frequency RF coil. Proceedings of the International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine Sixteenth Scientific Meeting, Toronto, Ontario, May 3-9, 2008.
  9. Alford JK, Rutt BK, Scholl TJ, Handler WB, Chronik BA. Delta relaxation enhanced MR: Improving activation-specificity of molecular probes through R(1) dispersion imaging. Magn Reson Med. 2009 Apr;61(4):796-302.
  10. Ronald JA, Chen Y, Bernas L, Kitzler HH, Rogers KA, Hegele RA, Rutt BK. Clinical field-strength MRI of amyloid plaques induced by low-level cholesterol feeding in rabbits. Brain. 2009 May;132(Pt 5):1346-54. Epub 2009 Mar 17.
  11. Hamilton AM, Rogers KA, Drangova M, Khan Z, Ronald JA, Rutt BK, Maclean KA, Lacefield JC, Boughner DR. The in vivo diagnosis of early-stage aortic valve sclerosis using magnetic resonance imaging in a rabbit model. J Magn Reson Imaging. 2009 Apr;29(4):825-31.
  12. Joy T, Kennedy BA, Al-Attar S, Rutt BK, Hegele RA. Predicting abdominal adipose tissue among women with familial partial lipodystrophy. Metabolism. 2009 Jun;58(6):828-34.
  13. Hamilton AM, Rogers KA, Drangova M, Khan Z, Ronald JA, Rutt BK, Maclean KA, Lacefield JC, Boughner DR. The in vivo diagnosis of early-stage aortic valve sclerosis using magnetic resonance imaging in a rabbit model. J Magn Reson Imaging. 2009 Apr;29(4):825-31.
  14. Rajendran R, Ronald JA, Ye T, Minqin R, Chen JW, Weissleder R, Rutt BK, Halliwell B, Watt F. Nuclear microscopy: a novel technique for quantitative imaging of gadolinium distribution within tissue sections. Microsc Microanal. 2009 Aug;15(4):338-44.
  15. Ronald JA, Chen JW, Chen Y, Hamilton AM, Rodriguez E, Reynolds F, Hegele RA, Rogers KA, Querol M, Bogdanov A, Weissleder R, Rutt BK. Enzyme-Sensitive Magnetic Resonance Imaging Targeting Myeloperoxidase Identifies Active Inflammation in Experimental Rabbit Atherosclerotic Plaques. Circulation. 2009 Aug 3. [Epub ahead of print]

Book Chapters

  1. Rutt BK. Vascular System MRI. Chapter in "The Physics of MRI", AAPM Monograph, American Institute of Physics Press, 1992.
  2. Lee DH, Rutt BK. Fast Imaging Methods for the Brain and Spine. Current review of MRI. 1st Edition. Ed. Javier Beltran. Chapter 7, pg. 85-103, Current Medicine, 1995.
  3. Rutt BK, Ronald JA. Future Technical Developments. Carotid Disease - The Role of Imaging in Diagnosis and Management. Eds. Jonathan Gillard, Martin Graves, Thomas Hatsukami and Chun Yuan. Chapter 35, pp. 483-496, Cambridge University Press, 2007.

Positions

Postings coming soon

Links

Department of Radiology

Molecular Imaging Program

Bio-X Program

Contact US

Student Offices

    Phone: (650) 724-6657

Professor Brian Rutt

    Room: PS064
    Phone: (650) 721-6230
    Email: brutt@stanford.edu